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Kitten Vaccination Schedule - Cat Shots

Depending on the age of your kitten, where you live and if your kitten will be an indoor or outdoor cat, your veterinarian is the best source of information for determining what vaccinations your kitten will require. Following is an example of a vaccination schedule that your veterinarian may recommend for a new cat.

Disease

Age (weeks)
1st Vaccination

Age (weeks)
2nd Vaccination

Age (months)
Boosters

Feline Panleukopenia

6-10

12-16

12

Feline Rhinotracheitis

8-10

12-16

12

Feline Calicivirus

6-10

12-16

12

Rabies

12-16

52

12 or 36*

Feline Leukemia Virus

10

12 and 24

12 or 13 and 14 **

Feline Chlamydiosis

6-10

12-16

12

* depends on local laws and which type of vaccine.
** vaccination protocols may vary. Verify with your veterinarian.

Feline Rhinotracheitis is the most widespread and severe upper respiratory infection in cats. The airways of cats become infected with tiny organisms. The vaccine may not prevent this disease but it will greatly reduce the severity.
Symptoms include:

  • fever and loss of appetite
  • sneezing and tearing
  • discharge from the nose and eyes

  • breathing from the mouth

  • coughing

Feline Panleukopenia or commonly known as feline distemper is a widespread and potentially fatal viral disease. Vaccination against this illness is of utmost importance as most cats are likely to be exposed to it in their lifetime. Kittens who are born from female cats who have this virus may suffer permanent brain damage. Prevention is through vaccination.
Symptoms include:

  • fever and depression 
  • loss of appetite
  • vomiting and  diarrhea
  • severe dehydration

  • sudden death.

Feline upper respiratory tract disease - cat 'flu 

Cat 'flu is a common cat disease that can be life-threatening for your kitten or cat. A multitude of symptoms include sneezing, nasal discharge, conjunctivitis (inflammation of the lining of the eyes), discharge from the eyes, loss of appetite, depression and fever. Occasionally, mouth and eye ulcers and excessive drooling of saliva may be seen. The very young, very old and immuno-suppressed cats are more likely to develop severe disease and die as a result of their 'flu. Where death occurs this is usually because of secondary infections (infections with bacteria in addition to the 'flu viruses), lack of nutrition and dehydration.

Although vaccination helps to reduce the risk of cat 'flu, this disease can still be seen in vaccinated cats. 

Causes and symptoms 

The symptoms of cat 'flu are most frequently caused by infection with one or both of the cat 'flu viruses - feline herpesvirus (formerly known as feline rhinotracheitis virus) and feline calicivirus.

 
















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Copyright 1999-2019 GregRobert Enterprises, LLC.

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Kitten Shots / Cat Vaccination Schedule from GregRobert 


Visit our sister site: Michigan Biz

Copyright 1999-2019 GregRobert Enterprises, LLC.

Family Owned / Family Values